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November 2021

Tuesday, 30 November 2021 00:00

Tired of Getting Cold Feet?

Cold feet, generally caused by poor blood flow, often increases as we age. Causes can be linked to having a more sedentary lifestyle, obesity, diabetes and smoking. But the sensation of cold feet, while annoying, can also indicate much more serious conditions, such as Deep Vein Thrombosis, or blood clots; hardening of the arteries, or atherosclerosis. These conditions can be life threatening and should not be overlooked. Some ways you can improve circulation to the feet include lowering blood pressure with a healthy diet, getting more exercise, and keeping your feet elevated by using a recliner. If symptoms of cold feet persist, please consult a podiatrist to find out more information on treatment methods.

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact one of our podiatrists of Foot Care Centers. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Vineland, Elmer, and Somers Point, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes Symptoms and Treatment for Poor Circulation in the Feet

Because walking and running are very different forms of movement, it doesn't make much sense to wear the same shoes for both activities. Walking calls for undercut heels, as opposed to the flared heels seen in running shoes. Walking shoes also should have a similar height between the heels and toes, and they should have flexibility in the forefoot and arch. Running calls for more cushioning in the forefoot and heel, and may contain mesh to help keep your feet cooler. Choosing the right shoes can prevent  injury and pain. If in doubt about what the proper footwear for walking and running is, it may be wise to consult a podiatrist for guidance.

For more information about walking shoes versus running shoes, consult with one of our podiatrists from Foot Care Centers. Our doctors can measure your feet to determine what your needs are and help you find an appropriate pair of footwear.

Foot Health: The Differences between Walking & Running Shoes

There are great ways to stay in shape: running and walking are two great exercises to a healthy lifestyle. It is important to know that running shoes and walking shoes are not interchangeable. There is a key difference on how the feet hit the ground when someone is running or walking. This is why one should be aware that a shoe is designed differently for each activity.

You may be asking yourself what the real differences are between walking and running shoes and the answers may shock you.

Differences

Walking doesn’t involve as much stress or impact on the feet as running does. However, this doesn’t mean that you should be any less prepared. When you’re walking, you land on your heels and have your foot roll forward. This rolling motion requires additional support to the feet.

Flexibility – Walking shoes are designed to have soft, flexible soles. This allows the walker to push off easily with each step.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Vineland, Elmer, and Somers Point, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Differences between Walking and Running Shoes
Tuesday, 16 November 2021 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Tuesday, 16 November 2021 00:00

Plantar Fasciitis: A Common Form of Heel Pain

Plantar fasciitis is the most common type of heel pain that podiatrists treat. This condition occurs in the plantar fascia, which is a long band of tissue on the sole of the foot that spans from the heel through the arch to the front of the foot. Because of its location and key role in walking, running, and jumping, the plantar fascia can become overly stretched, stressed, and even torn, causing it to become inflamed and painful. This is known as plantar (sole of the foot) fasciitis (inflammation of the fascia). Some factors that contribute to plantar fasciitis include obesity, working on your feet or standing for extended periods of time on a regular basis, having tight calf muscles, flat feet, or high arches. Contact a podiatrist for relief from the pain of plantar fasciitis.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact one of our podiatrists  from Foot Care Centers. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Vineland, Elmer, and Somers Point, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Tuesday, 09 November 2021 00:00

What Kind of Running Shoes Do I Need?

There are many running shoes available on the market, and they can usually be classified into five different types of shoes: motion control, stability, cushioned, lightweight, and trail. Motion control running shoes are designed to reduce any excessive rolling in your gait while you run and provide extra shock absorption. These shoes are especially useful for someone with an overpronated gait. Stability running shoes are designed to stop excess motion in the foot and ankle. Cushioned running shoes absorb shock and help protect the feet. Lightweight running shoes are more flexible and can decrease pain and fatigue while running. Trail shoes are designed to help you run on rugged terrain. They are usually more durable and have a better grip than other types of running shoes. To find out which running shoes may be best for you, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist. 

If you are a runner, wearing the right running shoe is essential. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot Care Centers. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Choosing the Right Running Shoe for Your Foot Type

To increase performance and avoid the risk of injury, it is important to choose the right running shoe based on your foot type. The general design of running shoes revolves around pronation, which is how the ankle rolls from outside to inside when the foot strikes the ground.

  • Neutral runners are able to choose from a wide variety of shoes, including minimalist shoes or even going barefoot.
  • Runners who overpronate, or experience an over-abundance of ankle rolling, should choose shoes that provide extra motion control and stability.
  • Runners who underpronate, or supinate, have feet that have high arches and lack flexibility, preventing shock absorption. They require shoes with more flexibility and cushion.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Vineland, Elmer, and Somers Point, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Choosing the Right Running Shoe for Your Foot Type
Tuesday, 02 November 2021 00:00

The Two Types of Flat Feet

Flat feet, or pes planus, is a condition where there is no visible arch in the foot. There are two types of flat feet: flexible and rigid. Flexible flat feet will have a visible arch when the foot is elevated, however that will disappear when weight is applied to the foot. Typically, flexible flat foot is asymptomatic, and it is believed to be a genetic condition. In rigid flat foot, the arch is never present—even when the foot is elevated. Rigid flat foot can be due to joint or bone disorders, which may be genetic. This type of flat foot can be problematic and cause gait disorders as well as pain in the arch, ankle, heel, and outside of the foot. If you have any discomfort in your feet due to flat feet, make an appointment with a podiatrist who can examine your feet and go over treatment options specific to your condition.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot Care Centers. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Vineland, Elmer, and Somers Point, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Flatfoot
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